Archive for July, 2009

Photo365: July 22, 2009

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

A lot of people dislike graffiti intensely, and cities often go to great lengths to remove it and to criminalize those who create it. Me, I’ve always kind of liked graffiti. It adds a certain, well, flair to otherwise dull city streets.

Graffiti

Graffiti

Photo365: July 21, 2009

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

A Davenport cousin I’ve worked with for some time finishing his manuscript on his Davenport family research sent me some lovely flowers as a thank you. He didn’t have to… but I’m glad he did. He gave me some “models” to practice shooting macros with…

Tiny white flower

Tiny white flower

Purple flower

Purple flower

Photo365: July 20, 2009

Monday, July 20th, 2009

I drive past this shop every single night on my way home from work, so it’s a natural for a photo of the day. And I’ve always thought that, if the person was a REAL psychic, he or she would know that I was taking the picture, and would obviously want to know who was taking the picture, and so any picture I took would show the curtains being twitched aside…

The psychic...?

The psychic...?

Well, there goes another fine theory down the drain…

Photo365: July 19, 2009

Sunday, July 19th, 2009

One of the things I like best about summer is all the color that nature displays for us to enjoy.

Summer flowers

Summer flowers

Photo365: July 18, 2009

Saturday, July 18th, 2009

Trying to get caught up on a million things these days now that I’ve wrapped up the editing I got conned into doing for a distant cousin who’s also a genealogy researcher. But I did find time to grab the camera when I looked out the kitchen window and saw this lovely little lady — I swear it looked like she was praying.

Female house finch

Female house finch

Photo365: July 17, 2009 – Farm Share 6

Friday, July 17th, 2009

This week’s organic farm share was heavy on greens (well, maybe not so green, some of ‘em), and all of it looked really good.

There was a big basket of what they called baby lettuce and turned out to be one small head of red leaf lettuce:

Red leaf lettuce

Red leaf lettuce

… and two small heads of green leaf lettuce.

Green leaf lettuce

Green leaf lettuce

There was another whole basket of mixed spectrum greens:

Spectrum greens

Spectrum greens

There was more cabbage:

Cabbage

Cabbage

And more scallions:

Scallions

Scallions

More kale, which has to be blanched and frozen tomorrow for sure — there’s been enough kale so far to feed an army!

The herbs included basil, mint, oregano, plus sage

Sage

Sage

and sorrel, which is a completely new one to me (anybody got a recipe that uses two leaves of sorrel??):

Sorrel

Sorrel

And there was the first fresh cauliflower of this share season.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Photo365: July 16, 2009

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

Anyone who even half-fancies himself (or herself) to be a cook would probably laugh at me. Here I am, considerably beyond the age at which people really learn to experiment with food and cook, and for the first time in my life I am discovering that (…gasp…) vegetables taste good. Really good. At least when they are fresh from the garden of an organic farm.

Last week’s farm share included a number of things I have never fixed for myself before (snow peas for example) and a number of things I have always loathed (cabbage for example). Tonight, my dinner contained both cabbage and snow peas and it was delicious.

The snow peas I sauteed in olive oil with minced garlic and just a taste — literally just a taste — of ginger flavored soy sauce. Oh yummm…

And the cabbage? Well, this morning, I shredded the entire head — about 11 ounces in the end — added some carrots and onions a homemade sauce, and voila! Coleslaw. But not that icky limp nasty stuff you get as a side dish in restaurants that you immediately throw away. No, this was crunchy and creamy and tasty!

I guess you really can teach old dogs new tricks.

Coleslaw

Coleslaw

Photo365: July 15, 2009

Thursday, July 16th, 2009

I am the family historian for my family, and every once in a while, something hits your desk that stops you in your tracks and makes you think about the past.

On 31 July 1906, my great grandfather Hermann Eduard Geissler witnessed the marriage of his daughter Martha Pauline Geissler to Paul Alfred Benschura in Gera, a town in Thüringen, Germany, then part of the principality of Reuss Jüngere Linie. I never met my great grandfather, or his daughter Martha, or even his son, my grandfather. They were all dead before I was born.

But today, just about 102 years after that ceremony, I received in the mail a copy of the record from the State Archives in Gera… with the signature of my great grandfather on it. It was as if he had reached out over the years to touch me.

Signature of H.E. Geissler

Signature of H.E. Geissler

Photo365: July 14, 2009

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

It’s amazing what detail exists in the world that we overlook all the time because those details are so small. The world writ small takes on a whole ‘nother dimension when seen through a 100mm macro lens…

There is amazing detail in the leaf of a long-leaf plant.

Plant leaf

Plant leaf

Amazing detail in something as simple as a geranium.

Geranium

Geranium

Geranium petal

Geranium petal

And when you look close-up at a plain basket, the detail is stunning.

Basket

Basket

Basket

Basket

Photo365: July 13, 2009

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

Very hectic busy busy day so very little time to shoot. Fortunately, this little lady cowbird was kind enough to pose for me for a minute so I’d have my picture of the day…

Female cowbird

Female cowbird